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eMedals-WWI Memorial Cross to an Australian POW

Item: C1259

WWI Memorial Cross to an Australian POW

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$400

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WWI Memorial Cross to an Australian POW

WWI Memorial Cross to an Australian POW - GRV (24825 Pte. C.B. CLARK). Naming is officially engraved. Very crisp detail, with horizontal pinback, light contact, near extremely fine. Accompanied by a CD containing thirteen pages with copies of his Index Cards, Attestation Paper, Service Records and Medical Records.  Footnote: Charles Branch Clark was born on April 18, 1894 in Melbourne, Australia, the son of Charles William Clark and Joan D. Clark. He signed his Attestation Paper with the 13th Infantry Battalion "Royal Highlanders of Canada" on September 23, 1914 at Camp Valcartier, Quebec, naming his next-of-kin as his mother, Mrs. Joan D. Morphet (formerly Clark) of Montreal, Quebec, stating that he had two years' previous service with the Liverpool Scottish and four months with the Royal Highlanders of Canada in Montreal, that he was not married and that his trade was that of Clerk. The Battalion was raised in Quebec and Nova Scotia with mobilization headquarters at Camp Valcartier, under the authority of P.C.O. 2067, August 6, 1914. The Battalion sailed October 3, 1914 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel F.O.W. Loomis with a strength of 45 officers and 1,112 other ranks. Six months after arriving in England, he left for the French theatre on April 1, 1915, and three weeks afterwards, was reported "missing" on April 22nd at the Second Battle of Ypres. The battle was fought for control of the strategic Flemish town of Ypres in western Belgium in the spring of 1915, following the First Battle of Ypres the previous autumn. It marked the first time that Germany used poison gas on a large scale on the Western Front. Additionally, the battle was the first time that a former colonial force (the 1st Canadian Division) defeated a major European power (the German Empire) on European soil, in the Battle of St. Julien-Kitcheners' Wood. Clark was later reported as a "Prisoner of War" at Roulers, Belgium on June 5th, and confirmed as such on July 3rd, hospitalized at Reserve-Lazarett (Reserve Hospital) at Staden, Belgium, with a gun shot wound to his left arm. Clark was a Prisoner of War, having served with "G" Company, 13th Infantry Battalion, when he died from his wounds on July 31, 1915, at the age of 21, at the Military Hospital in Roeselare (Roulers), Belgium. He is buried at Roulers Communal Cemetery, Roulers, Belgium, Grave III.B.2. His mother, Joan, received his Memorial Cross, as presented here, and his WWI trio of medals, which are not included.
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