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eMedals-WWI Canadian Army Veterinary & Horse Artillery Shoulder Titles

Item: C2339

WWI Canadian Army Veterinary & Horse Artillery Shoulder Titles

Price:

$50

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WWI Canadian Army Veterinary & Horse Artillery Shoulder Titles

WWI Canadian Army Veterinary & Horse Artillery Shoulder Titles - Canadian Army Veterinary Corps Shoulder Title (brass, maker marked "W. SCULLY MONTREAL" on the reverse, 14.5 mm x 46.5 mm, intact lugs); and Royal Canadian Horse Artillery Shoulder Title (bronze, maker marked "W. SCULLY MONTREAL" on the reverse, 14 mm x 51.3 mm, intact lugs). Light contact, near extremely fine.Footnote: The Canadian Army Veterinary Corps was established in 1910 as a unit of the Non-Permanent Active Militia. Its primary task was the care of over 130,000 horses. Within three weeks of the outbreak of World War I, two sections of the corps were attending to 9,000 horses in Canada, at the newly opened Camp Valcartier in Quebec, With the diminishing use of horses in warfare, the corps was disbanded shortly after the war. The Royal Canadian Horse Artillery was organized on August 6, 1914. Lieutenant-Colonel Andrew McNaughton, D.S.O., advanced the science of artillery through the development of the "rolling barrage", whereby advancing infantry would follow as close as thirty yards behind their own exploding shells, thus diminishing the ability of the enemy to identify non-protected areas of the assault. He also devised a system of "indirect fire" which allowed protection to the flanks of the advancing infantry by means of a protective web of bursting shells. The total strength of the RCHA was 37,714 all ranks, with casualties numbering 9,984 by the end of the conflict. It was disbanded on November 1, 1920.
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