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eMedals-Medals to Nursing Sister Catherine M. MacDonell; C.A.M.C.

Item: C2575

Medals to Nursing Sister Catherine M. MacDonell; C.A.M.C.

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Medals to Nursing Sister Catherine M. MacDonell; C.A.M.C.

Medals to Nursing Sister Catherine M. MacDonell; C.A.M.C. - British War Medal (N. SISTER C.M. MAC DONELL.); Victory Medal (N. SISTER C.M. MAC DONELL.); and French Ministere de la Guerre Médaille d'Honneur Épidémies en Argent (Ministry of War Medal of Honour for Epidemics, Silver Grade, silver, named in raised lettering "Mlle C.M. MAC DOUNEL 1919" on the reverse, 27.8 mm). Naming is officially impressed on the First World War Pair. MacDonell's surname is misspelled on the French medal (MacDouell). Un-mounted, original ribbons, dark patina on the BWM, contact marks on the VM, near extremely fine. Accompanied by her Laconia (New Hampshire) Hospital Nursing Badge (14 K Gold with blue enamels, marked "14 K" and engraved "C.M. Macdonell Feb. 1913." on the reverse, 24 mm, horizontal pinback, enamel chipping).       Footnote: Catherine Mary MacDonell was born on April 10, 1889 in Ontario. She had been a nurse, at the age of 24, at Laconia Hospital in Laconia, New Hampshire in 1913, as evidenced by the accompanying nursing badge. MacDonell enlisted with the Canadian Army Medical Corps, on March 15, 1917 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, at the age of 27, naming her next-of-kin as Mrs. Angus MacDonell of 102 Broadway Court in Winnipeg, stating that she had no previous military service, that her religion was Roman Catholic and that her trade was that of Professional Nurse. She also did not specify her marital status. She served as a Nursing Sister with the 6th Canadian General Hospital (Ontario Hospital, Orpington) during the later years of the war and afterwards, surviving the war without injury. She was awarded the French Ministere de la Guerre Médaille d'Honneur Épidémies en Argent (Ministry of War Medal of Honour for Epidemics, Silver Grade), as mentioned in the London Gazettte 32838, page 4516, on June 29, 1923. Some 2,854 women served with the Canadian Army Medical Corps as Nursing Sisters during the five years of the war, several hundred others with other forces. They came form all over Canada, most in their early to mid-twenties, some drawn by patriotism, others for the adventure. One hundred nurses sailed with the first Contingent in September 1914 and of the 2,854 Nursing Sisters, approximately 2,411 served overseas, some others enlisted with the British Army, and others, without nursing training, served as Voluntary Aid Dispenser (V.A.D.). These women served in hospitals in England, France and the Eastern Mediterranean at Gallipoli, Alexandria and Salonika and upon Hospital Ships. Approximately forty-six Nursing Sisters lost their lives during, or shortly after, the war. Fourteen died with the sinking of the Llansovery castle on June 27, 1918, one drowned at sea in a separate incident, six were killed by enemy action, during the deliberate bombing of hospitals near Etaples (No. 1, No. 2, No. 5, and No. 7 Canadian Stationary Hospitals), and Doullens (No. 3 Canadian Stationary Hospital) in May 1918. Approximately twenty-two died of disease.  
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