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eMedals-A Second War British Medal Bar with Decorations; D-Day (Juno Beach)

Item: GB3446

A Second War British Medal Bar with Decorations; D-Day (Juno Beach)

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$500

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A Second War British Medal Bar with Decorations; D-Day (Juno Beach)

A WWI British Medal Bar with Decorations; D-Day (Juno Beach) Participant - 1939-1945 Star; France and Germany Star; War Medal 1939-1945 with MID Oak Leaf Clasp; and Belgian WWII War Cross with bronze Leopold III Cypher Palm. Unnamed, court-mounted with swing bar pinback, as worn by the veteran, original ribbons, extremely fine. Accompanied by a matching 12.5 mm x 133.5 mm ribbon bar with bronze MID Oak Leaf and Leopold III Clasps attached, a hardshelled Case of Issue for the Belgian WWII War Cross (dual prong hanger inside), two British Army on the Rhine (BAOR) Formation Patches (blue and yellow embroidered cotton, 44.5 mm x 64.5 mm each), a Royal Army Service Corps Cap Badge (bronze, 43.2 mm x 43.4 mm, intact slider), along with seven original letters and documents, including: Supplement to the London Gazette (confirming his award of the Belgian War Cross 1940 with Palm, on page 5142, dated October 15, 1946), London Gazette Certificate (stating that he was published in the London Gazette on March 22, 1945, as Mentioned in Despatches), London Gazette Certificate (stating that he was published in the London Gazette on November 8, 1945, as Mentioned in Despatches), letter from RASC Records Department (confirming that he had been Mentioned in Despatches, that his name was to be published in the London Gazette on November 8, 1945, and that his certificate and emblems would be forwarded to him, dated March 30, 1946), letter from the RACS Records Department (accompanying his Belgian War Cross 1940 with Palm, "For courage and bravery in the glorious battles which led to the liberation of Belgium", dated November 21, 1946), letter from the War Office (accompanying the MID Oak Leaf, as per the London Gazette of March 3, 1945, dated June 22, 1948) and letter from Headquarters British Army of the Rhine (confirming his award of the Belgian War Cross 1940 with Palm, dated February 7, 1946), plus a Medals Instruction Slip (explaining the Wearing of Medals and confirming he was awarded the three British medals and one MID clasp), two Newspaper Articles, a Holiday in Canada Diary (dated September 3-22, 1981), six Photographs (three of Harvey in his RASC uniform, dated 1944; two of his grave site in England; one inside a church) and assorted research papers.     Footnote: Douglas Harvey was born on July 25, 1916. S/14414514 Lance Corporal Harvey was with the Royal Army Service Corps when he landed with the Regina Rifles (Canada) in Normandy on D-Day, June 6, 1944 with Headquarters 102 Beach Sub Area, in support of the 3rd Canadian Division. He told many people after the fact, that at all times after he landed, he was escorted by an armed guard, who had instructions to shoot him if there was any possibility he could be captured by the Germans. One of his officers said "he has a tremendous capacity for work of a very high standard." Harvey took part in operations for the Liberation of France, Belgium and Holland (The Netherlands) and was Mentioned in Despatches on March 22, 1945 and November 8, 1945, as cited in the London Gazette, for his work on the Planning Staff on D-Day and in connection with the relief of Holland. He later achieved the rank of Sergeant and was also acknowledged for his work in connection with the relief of Belgium, which was marked by an award of the Croix de Guerre 1940 (War Cross) with Palm, directed to be worn by the authority of Headquarters British Army of the Rhine (BAOR) on February 7, 1946. The BAOR was officially created in August 1945 as the British occupation force in Germany. He was published in the London Gazette, page 5142 on October 15, 1946 for his award of the Belgian War Cross 1940 with Palm. After three years in the Army, Harvey was demobilized in November 1946. He returned to civilian life, working for the Rawdon Foundry and Engineering Company Limited in Moira, Leicestershire, England. In his retirement years, he later took a tour of Canada in September 1981, a year before he passed away in Newhall, South Derbyshire, England on September 23, 1982, at the age of 66.
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