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eMedals-British War Medal -  Pte. W. Piper 2-Can.Inf.

Item: C0679

British War Medal - Pte. W. Piper 2-Can.Inf.

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British War Medal - Pte. W. Piper 2-Can.Inf.

British War Medal -  Pte. W. Piper 2-Can.Inf; (8518 PTE. W. PIPER. 2-CAN.INF.). Naming is officially impressed. Very crisp detail, bright patina, polished, original ribbon, extremely fine. Accompanied by copies of his Attestation Paper, Service Records, Medical Records and Discharge Certificate. Footnote: William Piper was born on March 15, 1880 in Llepney (London), England. He enlisted at Port Hope, Ontario on August 12, 1914. He signed his Attestation Paper on September 23 at Valcartier, Quebec, stating that he was married, that he had previous military service and that his trade was that of Labourer. Piper served with the 2nd Battalion in Canada, Great Britain and France. Although it is stated on his Medical Record card that he suffered a Gun Shot Wound to the head on May 20, 1916, accompanying his paperwork is a letter written by Piper and addressed to the Camp Commandant, dated November 27, 1917. He stated: "On the night of the 22nd May 1916, between the hours of one and two a.m. whilst resting upon my bed in the Guard Room at Abeele, Belgium, I was suddenly attacked by Private Fay, who had that day just returned from leave of absence. All I can remember is hearing Corporal Marchant call out "Look out"; I turned round to find Private Fay standing over me with a rifle raised above his head in a striking manner. I tried to evade the blow but could not, consequently I was struck on the head and received a serious wound and was taken in all haste to NO. 16 Imperial Casualty Clearing Station at Boeschepe and stayed there for a period of 8 days; afterwards I returned to duty at Abbeele. Corporal Bolus dressed by wound at the time I was struck by Private Fay." The dates are off by a few days but the incident is documented with some accuracy. In January 1917, he spent four days with No. 2 Canadian Field Ambulance (11th-15th), then an additional two days (15th-17th) with No. 4 Canadian Field Ambulance, recovering from influenza. While in Europe, he attained the rank of Corporal and was discharged from active service in accordance with R.O. 1327, on December 3, 1918 at Kingston, Ontario. (COM865)
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