Tel: 1 (905) 634-3848

Text: 1 (905) 906-3848

Purveyors of Authentic Militaria

  • United States. A Congressional Medal of Honour, to Edward P. Nicholson, 27th Maine Infantry
  • United States. A Congressional Medal of Honour, to Edward P. Nicholson, 27th Maine Infantry
  • United States. A Congressional Medal of Honour, to Edward P. Nicholson, 27th Maine Infantry
  • United States. A Congressional Medal of Honour, to Edward P. Nicholson, 27th Maine Infantry
  • United States. A Congressional Medal of Honour, to Edward P. Nicholson, 27th Maine Infantry

Item: M0041-206

United States. A Congressional Medal of Honour, to Edward P. Nicholson, 27th Maine Infantry

Price:

$8,000

Optional Payments Available

Layaway PolicyItem is available for our layaway plan.

Installments to be paid every month.
Your CC will be charged automatic.
We don't save your CC details. You are secure.

* Final amount varies depending on shipping, tax & other charges.

Layaway Policy

eMedals INC. is pleased to offer flexible layaway services to all clients. Our layaway program offers the opportunity for clients to make payments on eligible items over a period of three (3) months.

A minimum deposit of 30% of the total price of your order including all applicable taxes and Buyer’s Premium, is due at the time of initial purchase. The total price of your order must be paid within three months from the date of original purchase.

You may make additional payments at any time by accessing the Layaway section in your account or by calling our office and submitting payment details.

Your contract will be automatically cancelled and ordered merchandise will be returned to inventory if full payment is not submitted by the three (3) month deadline.

Payment methods include; Cheque, Wire Transfer, Paypal, or Credit Card.

0% Buyer's Premium

eMedals proudly ships worldwide, see our shipping information

What's a max bid?

Your maximum bid should be the highest amount you're willing to pay for an item.

Your entered maximum bid will not be disclosed to the seller or other auction participants at any point.

Max bidding example:

If the current auction price is $100 dollars and you place a maximum bid of $120 dollars, the system will bid $101 dollars on your behalf.

If no other participant places a bid, you win that auction lot for $101 dollars.

If another auction participant places a bid of $110 dollars, the system will subsequently place a bid of $111 dollars on your behalf. The system will continue to bid in $1.00 dollar increments until your maximum bid of $120 dollars is exceeded.

If another auction participant places a bid for $125 dollars, the auction lot price will display $121 dollars having exceeded your previously submitted maximum bid by $1.00 dollar.

Buyer's Premium

All bids are subject to a Buyer's Premium which is in addition to the placed successful bid. The following rate of Buyer's Premium will be added to the Hammer Price of each Lot that you purchase:

Twenty-Two Percent (22%) of the Hammer Price

United States. A Congressional Medal of Honour, to Edward P. Nicholson, 27th Maine Infantry

Type I. In bronze, engraved "The Congress to Edward P. Nicholson Co. B. 27th Me. Vol" on the reverse, measuring 53 mm (w) x 68.5 mm (h) inclusive of its eagle and crossed cannons and cannonballs suspension, variation of the American flag in the ribbon, bronze pinback hanger with U.S. shield, spotting and contact marks evident on the reverse, edge nicks, near extremely fine.
 
Footnote: The 27th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment was comprised by men raised almost entirely in York County, Maine, reporting to camp in Portland on or around the September 10, 1862. On the 19th, the officers were elected, followed by the mustering in of the troops on the 30th. They left by train for Washington, DC on October 20th, arriving there two days later and setting up camp on East Capital Hill. From there, they went on to Camp Chase at Arlington Heights, afterwards to Camp Seward, where they held picket duty from October 26 to December 12, 1862. Following this, they were sent to Camp Vermont at Hunting Creek, Virginia, to relieve a Vermont brigade of their picket duty, an "eight mile long line from the Orange & Alexandria Railroad to the Potomac River near Mt. Vernon". It was here where they spent the winter, reported to be a severe one, and they lost several men due to the weather. The next spring, March 24, 1863, they left camp and moved on to Chantilly, Virginia, where they were placed on the outermost line of infantry in the defense of Washington. They stayed here until June 25th, when they returned to Arlington Heights. At this time, their nine month term of service had expired (they were told they would be released on June 10th, nine months from their reporting to camp) and they were preparing to ship home. On the request of President Abraham Lincoln, Secretary of War Edwin Stanton sent letters on June 28, 1863 to the commanding officers of the 25th Maine and 27th Maine regiments, asking for them to remain beyond their contracted service due to the invasion of Pennsylvania by Robert E. Lee and his army. With the 25th Maine Infantry first refusing, and marching home, some 312 men (or 315 by another account) of the 27th Maine did choose to stay behind when they were asked. On July 4th, with the Union winning the Battle of Gettysburg, they then boarded the trains in Washington and were back in Portland, Maine on the July 6, 1863. They were then mustered out on the 17th. The 27th Maine Infantry, at their mustering in, had 949 men. Of this, 20 men died on duty (though none by enemy fire), 8 officers resigned, and 54 men were discharged or had deserted. For their voluntary defense of the nation's capital, the 312 were initially rewarded the Medal of Honor. Following the end of the war, when the promise to award medals to the volunteers was fulfilled, there was a lack of an agreeable list of those who stayed behind in Washington. This resulted in some 864 medals being made, and it was left up to Wentworth to distribute them to those members he remembered staying behind with him. All 864 of these medals were later purged by Congress in 1917, as the actions of the regiment did not meet the criteria for receiving such a medal.
Back To Top