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  • A Fine American DSM Grouping to Colonel William Randolph Winslow
  • A Fine American DSM Grouping to Colonel William Randolph Winslow
  • A Fine American DSM Grouping to Colonel William Randolph Winslow
  • A Fine American DSM Grouping to Colonel William Randolph Winslow
  • A Fine American DSM Grouping to Colonel William Randolph Winslow
  • A Fine American DSM Grouping to Colonel William Randolph Winslow
  • A Fine American DSM Grouping to Colonel William Randolph Winslow
  • A Fine American DSM Grouping to Colonel William Randolph Winslow
  • A Fine American DSM Grouping to Colonel William Randolph Winslow
  • A Fine American DSM Grouping to Colonel William Randolph Winslow
  • A Fine American DSM Grouping to Colonel William Randolph Winslow
  • A Fine American DSM Grouping to Colonel William Randolph Winslow
  • A Fine American DSM Grouping to Colonel William Randolph Winslow
  • A Fine American DSM Grouping to Colonel William Randolph Winslow
  • A Fine American DSM Grouping to Colonel William Randolph Winslow
  • A Fine American DSM Grouping to Colonel William Randolph Winslow
  • A Fine American DSM Grouping to Colonel William Randolph Winslow

Item: C4340

A Fine American DSM Grouping to Colonel William Randolph Winslow

$2,200

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A Fine American DSM Grouping to Colonel William Randolph Winslow

Distinguished Service Medal (bronze gilt, engraved "WILLIAM R. WINSLOW" on the reverse, numbered 8628, 32 mm, original ribbon with brooch pinback, accompanied by its 10.5 mm x 36.5 mm Ribbon Bar and its 3.8 mm x 17.2 mm Enamelled Ribbon Bar, along with an award card from Brigadier General Roland Walsh, Army Service Forces in Philadelphia, in its hardshelled case of issue, marked "DISTINGUISHED SERVICE MEDAL" on the lid); Bronze Star Medal (bronze, 35.8 mm, original ribbon with brooch pinback, accompanied by its 10 mm x 35.5 mm Ribbon Bar, in its hardshelled case of issue, marked "BRONZE STAR MEDAL" on the lid); World War I Victory Medal (bronze, 36 mm, original ribbon with brooch pinback); American Defense Service Medal (bronze, 32 mm, original ribbon with brooch pinback); American Campaign Medal (bronze, 32 mm, original ribbon with brooch pinback); European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal (bronze, 31.8 mm, original ribbon with brooch pinback, accompanied by its 10.5 mm x 35 mm Ribbon Bar, in its cardboard box of issue); World War II Victory Medal (bronze, 36.2 mm, original ribbon with brooch pinback); Belgium: Order of Leopold, Officer with Swords and Gold Palm (silver gilt with red, white, green and black enamels, 43 mm x 77.5 mm inclusive of its crown suspension, gold palm and large rosette on original ribbon with dual prong pinback, in its hardshelled case of issue, maker marked "S.A. Van LAREBEKE V.V. BRUXELLES" on the inside lid); Belgium: Croix de Guerre (War Cross) 1940 with Bronze Palm (bronze, 38.5 mm x 62.7 mm inclusive of its crown suspension, bronze palm on original ribbon with dual prong pinback); France: Order of the Legion of Honor, Knight (Third Republic) (silver gilt with green, white and blue enamels, cornucopia hallmarked on the tip, 40.5 mm x 54.7 mm inclusive of its wreath suspension, in its hardshelled case of issue, maker marked "A. BACQUEVILLE PARIS" on the inside lid); France: Croix de Guerre (War Cross) 1939-1945 with Bronze Star (bronze, "1939" reverse, 38 mm, bronze star on original ribbon with dual prong pinback, in its cardboard box of issue); Luxembourg: Order of the Oak Crown, Officer (silver gilt with green and white enamels, 40 mm, large rosette on original ribbon with dual prong pinback, in its hardshelled case of issue); and Luxembourg: War Cross 1940-1945 (bronze, 30 mm x 45 mm, original ribbon with dual prong pinback, in its cardboard box of issue). Extremely fine. Accompanied by a Newspaper Article (illustrating Colonel William Randolph Winslow's widow, Marcella, showing their two children the Distinguished Service Medal that had been awarded to him posthumously, 100 mm x 174 mm, mounted to a 145 mm x 193 mm card); along with assorted research papers. Footnote: William Randolph "Willy" Winslow was born on November 19, 1901 in Tennessee, the son of Eben Eveleth Winslow (1866-1928) and Anne Goodwin Winslow (1875-1959). He was named after his grandfather, William RandolphWinslow (1844-1869) who was a paymaster for the United States Navy. His great grandfather was Rear Admiral John Ancrum Winslow, United States Navy, who was assigned to hunt for Confederate raiders in European waters. He is famous for commanding the USS Kearsarge, a Mohican-class sloop-of-war at the Battle of Cherbourg, France, defeating and sinking the Confederate commerce raider CSS Alabama, on June 19, 1864, during the American Civil War. His father was General Eben Eveleth Winslow, who was born on May 13, 1866 in Washington, D.C. and entered the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York from Massachusetts, graduating number one in the Class of 1889. He was a mathematician, famous for designing and superintending construction of the fortifications at Diamond Head in Honolulu, Hawaii and the Panama Canal. He served as a Captain in the Spanish American War and as Assistant to the Chief of Engineers, re-organizing the Engineering Corps during the First World War. For his re-organization of the Engineering Corps, he was awarded the Army Distinguished Service Medal in the rank of Colonel with the Military Section, Office of the Chief of Engineers, by General Orders of the War Department, General Orders No. 47 (1919): "The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Army Distinguished Service Medal to Colonel (Corps of Engineers) Eben Eveleth Winslow, United States Army, for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished services to the Government of the United States, in a duty of great responsibility during World War I. While in charge of the Military Section of the Office of the Chief of Engineers during the early period of the war, Colonel Winslow's services were marked by the energy, zeal, and good judgment which were essential to the procurement of personnel and equipment and the organization and training of engineer organizations for overseas service." He retired in 1922, dying six years later, on June 28, 1928 in Raleigh, Tennessee, at the age of 62 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia, Section 4E, Site 2661. His mother, Anne Goodwin Winslow was born in Memphis, Tennessee and was a successful novelist and poet in her own right. Although she had little formal schooling, she produced novels, poetry, short stories and non-fiction. One of her more well known books, "The Dwelling Place" was under the pen name of Anne Goodwin. The young William RandolphWinslow enjoyed reading and studying, which would continue throughout his life. He related well to people, both officially and socially. He graduated as a Distinguished Cadet from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, Class of 1923. One his former classmates stated that Winslow "felt it was a challenge to learn in a rigid system with some show of success, without compromising his thinking about its relation to life as he saw it at that time". He attended Engineer School and was in Hawaii with the 3rd Engineers, before transferring to the University of California, where he earned a Master's Degree in Engineering. He was an Assistant District Engineer performing various assignments in June 1940 and was named Major while in the Corps of Engineers the following July. Another colleague reflected upon memories of Winslow by stating that "I first really got to know Willy Winslow when we were stationed together in Pittsburgh. I quickly found him a highly competent engineer, but it took longer to find out what a generous, loyal friend he was behind an outwardly diffident manner. An avid seeker of knowledge, and a connoisseur of the good life, he was to those to whom he gave of his affection a good friend and companion." He demonstrated his ability as a practical engineer, as he was a resident engineer on the Tagert Dam Project in Colorado. He was blessed with intellectual curiosity and was able to assimilate a great deal of information. It was noted that "while his job came first, he was able to correlate this knowledge, to give him a perspective of human relations and some sort of the processes that make ideas what they are and people act the way they do". He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel on December 24, 1941 and to Colonel on November 12, 1942. He did a tour in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of War, then was posted to the Command and General Staff School, before joining the Combat Engineers Regiment as a field soldier. He went overseas with the Regiment in June 1943 and was stationed in Sudbury, England, receiving many commendations. His fellow officers called him "Uncle Willy", the Adjutant describing him as "thoughtful but expected and got the best". He was "stable and brilliant with always new ideas" and had a "vast store of knowledge but not in an ivory tower" and "talked in simple language to us but was at home with the top brass and civilians". A friend and former classmate at West Point, Kenner Hertford, said that Winslow "took life in a sort of philosophical stride, tempered with humor an innate sense of the 'fitness of things' " and that he "never failed to listen and select those ideas the thought worth considering". He went on to state that Winslow viewed "life as a sort of game to be played seriously on a checker board where risks could be taken intelligently but with a debonair and nonchalant attitude. His background always gave him a certain confidence, sometimes bewildering his colleagues in the conventional play". Winslow left with the Regiment to go to the Engineer VIII Corps with General Troy Middleton in June 1944. He took part in the invasion France, the capture of Brest and Cherbourg, along with the breakthrough from Constances to Avranche. Ironically, both Winslow and his great grandfather, Rear Admiral John Ancrum Winslow, were at Cherbourg, eighty years removed from one another. He was married to Marcella Comès Winslow (September 3, 1905 - July 6, 2000, AKA Marcella Rodange Comès), who was an American photographer and portrait painter. She was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the daughter of architect John T. Comès, attended the Carnegie Mellon College of Fine Arts and was trained in Europe. During the war, while her husband was in Europe, she lived in Washington, D.C. with their two children, Mary and John, very active in the art scene. Their home in Georgetown was a salon space frequented by literary figures of the time. Comès was the official portrait painter of the United States Poet Laureate. Colonel William Randolph Winslow, Engineer, VIII Corps died from pneumonia, due to overwork, while in the Line of Duty, Non-Battle (DNB) on February 24, 1945 in Luxembourg, at the age of 43. His body was returned to the United States and buried in Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia, Plot: Section 8, Site 288SH on April 14, 1949, his headstone ordered from Green Mountain, Vermont. At the time of his death, he was survived by his wife, Marcella, his daughter, Mary R. Winslow, his son, John Randolph Winslow, all of Washington, D.C. His wife was buried alongside him when she passed away in 2000. Colonel William Randolph Winslow was posthumously awarded the Army Distinguished Service Medal by General Orders of the War Department, General Orders No. 48 (1945), for actions during the Second World War: "Colonel William R. Winslow (ASN: 0-15128), United States Army, was awarded the Army Distinguished Service Medal (Posthumously) for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished services to the Government of the United States, in a duty of great responsibility as Engineer, EIGHTH Corps, in 1945." He was also posthumously awarded the Belgian Order of Leopold, Officer with Swords and Gold Palm and Croix de Guerre (War Cross) 1940 with Bronze Palm (No. 015128), along with the French Order of the Legion of Honor, Knight. He never mentioned his various awards and his family learned of them, only when they were sent home. (C:95)
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