Tel: 1 (905) 634-3848

Text: 1 (905) 906-3848

Purveyors of Authentic Militaria

  • A Fine 1860's Mexican Imperial Order of Guadalupe; 3rd Class Knight's Cross in Gold
  • A Fine 1860's Mexican Imperial Order of Guadalupe; 3rd Class Knight's Cross in Gold
  • A Fine 1860's Mexican Imperial Order of Guadalupe; 3rd Class Knight's Cross in Gold
  • A Fine 1860's Mexican Imperial Order of Guadalupe; 3rd Class Knight's Cross in Gold
  • A Fine 1860's Mexican Imperial Order of Guadalupe; 3rd Class Knight's Cross in Gold
  • A Fine 1860's Mexican Imperial Order of Guadalupe; 3rd Class Knight's Cross in Gold
  • A Fine 1860's Mexican Imperial Order of Guadalupe; 3rd Class Knight's Cross in Gold
  • A Fine 1860's Mexican Imperial Order of Guadalupe; 3rd Class Knight's Cross in Gold

Item: W3623

A Fine 1860's Mexican Imperial Order of Guadalupe; 3rd Class Knight's Cross in Gold

$2,450

0% Buyer's Premium

eMedals proudly ships worldwide, see our shipping information

What's a max bid?

Your maximum bid should be the highest amount you're willing to pay for an item.

Your entered maximum bid will not be disclosed to the seller or other auction participants at any point.

Max bidding example:

If the current auction price is $100 dollars and you place a maximum bid of $120 dollars, the system will bid $101 dollars on your behalf.

If no other participant places a bid, you win that auction lot for $101 dollars.

If another auction participant places a bid of $110 dollars, the system will subsequently place a bid of $111 dollars on your behalf. The system will continue to bid in $1.00 dollar increments until your maximum bid of $120 dollars is exceeded.

If another auction participant places a bid for $125 dollars, the auction lot price will display $121 dollars having exceeded your previously submitted maximum bid by $1.00 dollar.

Buyer's Premium

All bids are subject to a Buyer's Premium which is in addition to the placed successful bid. The following rate of Buyer's Premium will be added to the Hammer Price of each Lot that you purchase:

Twenty-Two Percent (22%) of the Hammer Price

A Fine 1860's Mexican Imperial Order of Guadalupe; 3rd Class Knight's Cross in Gold

(1863-1867) :Military, Type III; Multi-piece construction, Gold with red, green, blue and violet enamels, unmarked, 36 mm x 60.5 mm inclusive of its crowned Mexican golden eagle perched on a prickly pear cactus devouring a snake suspension, very fine chipping in the blue enamels on the robe of Our Lady of Guadalupe, the remainder of the enamels are intact, extremely fine.

Footnote: The Imperial Order of Guadalupe (originally: "National Order of Our Lady of Guadalupe") was established by Emperor Agustín I of Mexico in the fall of 1821, although its statutes would not be published until February 1822. It was originally divided into two classes: Grand Cross and Numerary Member. After the death of the Agustin I, the Order fell out of use and remained inactive for thirty years until Antonio López de Santa Anna convinced Pope Pius IX to recognize it in 1854. It fell into disuse again in August of that same year after the successful Ayutla Revolution and the ousting of Santa Anna from government. The third and last period of the Order began on June 30, 1863, before the arrival of Maximilian I, by decree of the Provisional Imperial Government. Maximilian I modified the statutes of the Order for the last time on April 10, 1865, renaming the order "Imperial" (instead of "National") and divided it into four ranks, each with civilian and military divisions: Grand Cross, limited to 30 recipients; Grand Officer, limited to 100 recipients; Commander, limited to 200 recipients; Knight, limited to 500 recipients. The current coat of arms of Mexico has been an important symbol of Mexican politics and culture for centuries. The coat of arms depicts a Mexican golden eagle perched on a prickly pear cactus devouring a snake. To the people of the Aztec city state of Tenochtitlan, this would have strong religious connotations, but to the Europeans, it would come to symbolize the triumph of good over evil (with the snake sometimes representative of the serpent in the Garden of Eden).

Back To Top