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  • Canada. An Efficiency Medal, Carleton Light Infantry, 104th Infantry Battalion
  • Canada. An Efficiency Medal, Carleton Light Infantry, 104th Infantry Battalion
  • Canada. An Efficiency Medal, Carleton Light Infantry, 104th Infantry Battalion

Item: C5645

Canada. An Efficiency Medal, Carleton Light Infantry, 104th Infantry Battalion

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Canada. An Efficiency Medal, Carleton Light Infantry, 104th Infantry Battalion

George V, with CANADA scroll (SGT. H. HOCKENHULL CARLT. L.I.). Naming is officially impressed. Edge nicks, contact marks, replacement ribbon, fine.

 

Footnote: Harry Hockenhull was born on July 4, 1884 in the Parish of Acton, Cheshire County, England. He signed his Attestation Paper as a Private (710012) with the 104th Infantry Battalion, on January 12, 1916 in Sussex, New Brunswick, at the age of 31, naming his next-of-kin as his brother, Alfred A. Hockenhull of Fort Fairfield, Maine, USA, since his mother and father were deceased, stating that he was not with an active militia, that he had no previous military service, that he was not married, that his religion was Episcopal and that his trade was that of Baker. The Battalion was raised in New Brunswick with mobilization headquarters at Sussex under the authority of G.O. 151, December 22, 1915. The Battalion sailed from Halifax, Nova Scotia aboard the S.S. Olympic, on June 28, 1916 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel G.W. Fowler with a strength of 42 officers and 1,084 other ranks, arriving in England shortly thereafter. Three weeks later, he was transferred to Canadian Army Service Corps at Caesar's Camp on July 17, 1916. The following year, he was posted to the Canadian Army Service Corps Depot on May 14, 1917, then assigned to the Canadian Army Service Corps, London District on June 23rd. Private Hockenhull was granted his first Good Conduct Badge on January 12, 1918. He was with the Canadian Army Service Corps, when he received his orders to proceed overseas for service in the French theatre on August 2, 1918, arriving in France on the 3rd. Ten days later, he was posted to the 2nd Field Battery on the 13th. Upon the ceasing of hostilities, he proceeded to England on March 31, 1919, where he was posted to the Canadian Army Service Corps Depot on April 1st. Private Hockenhull was then posted to "J" Wing, at the Canadian Corps Camp at Witley. In his Medical History of an Invalid, dated June 18, 1919 at Witley Camp, Surrey, the doctors had diagnosed him with a right and left Inguinal Hernia, which dated back to October 1918 while he was serving in France. At that time, while engaged as a Baker, he was lifting bags of flour, etc. and noticed swelling in his right groin, to about the size of a walnut. He was experiencing epididymitis, which was an inflammation of the epididymis, a tube located at the back of the testicles that stores and carries sperm. Although it had not grown larger upon examination at Witley, it was causing moderate weakness of the muscles in his groin. Also in October 1918, he had had his left testicle pinched against a table and the epididymis became swollen, but he was able to carry on his duties. In addition, the doctors stated that Hockenhull had Myopic Astigmatism, which was causing him defective vision but that he had had the condition since childhood. The doctors indicated that he would require an operation to correct the hernia situation, designating him as Category "B", fit for Service Abroad but not for General Service. He was struck off strength to Canada on July 1, 1919. Private Harry Hockenhull was discharged upon demobilization, at Dispersal Station "C", Military District No. 7 in St. John, New Brunswick, on July 9, 1919, credited with having served in Canada, England and France, entitled to wear the War Service Badge, Class "A", number 290120. He stated his proposed residence as Woodstock, New Brunswick. For his First World War service, he was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. He was later a recipient of the Efficiency Medal while with the Carleton Light Infantry. He died on February 22, 1965 at Lancaster Department of Veterans Affairs Hospital in Lancaster, New Brunswick, at the age of 80.

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