Tel: 1 (905) 634-3848

Text: 1 (905) 906-3848

Purveyors of Authentic Militaria

  • United Kingdom. A General Service Medal with Fort Detroit Clasp to Pte. John Smelsor, 1812
  • United Kingdom. A General Service Medal with Fort Detroit Clasp to Pte. John Smelsor, 1812
  • United Kingdom. A General Service Medal with Fort Detroit Clasp to Pte. John Smelsor, 1812
  • United Kingdom. A General Service Medal with Fort Detroit Clasp to Pte. John Smelsor, 1812
  • United Kingdom. A General Service Medal with Fort Detroit Clasp to Pte. John Smelsor, 1812
  • United Kingdom. A General Service Medal with Fort Detroit Clasp to Pte. John Smelsor, 1812
  • United Kingdom. A General Service Medal with Fort Detroit Clasp to Pte. John Smelsor, 1812

Item: M0496-1

United Kingdom. A General Service Medal with Fort Detroit Clasp to Pte. John Smelsor, 1812

Current Bid:

Bid History

$4,050
0

Time Remaining:

Submitting

Bid Amount:

Time Remaining:

Confirm?

By submitting this bid, you agree to eMedals Inc.'s Terms & Conditions.

Enter Your Secret Max Bid  

Enter $ 4051 or more

Buyer's Premium  

eMedals proudly ships worldwide, see our shipping information

What's a max bid?

Your maximum bid should be the highest amount you're willing to pay for an item.

Your entered maximum bid will not be disclosed to the seller or other auction participants at any point.

Max bidding example:

If the current auction price is $100 dollars and you place a maximum bid of $120 dollars, the system will bid $101 dollars on your behalf.

If no other participant places a bid, you win that auction lot for $101 dollars.

If another auction participant places a bid of $110 dollars, the system will subsequently place a bid of $111 dollars on your behalf. The system will continue to bid in $1.00 dollar increments until your maximum bid of $120 dollars is exceeded.

If another auction participant places a bid for $125 dollars, the auction lot price will display $121 dollars having exceeded your previously submitted maximum bid by $1.00 dollar.

Buyer's Premium

All bids are subject to a Buyer's Premium which is in addition to the placed successful bid. The following rate of Buyer's Premium will be added to the Hammer Price of each Lot that you purchase:

Twenty-Two Percent (22%) of the Hammer Price

United Kingdom. A General Service Medal with Fort Detroit Clasp to Pte. John Smelsor, 1812

Military General Service Medal, in silver, naming has been period corrected as J. SMELSOR is engraved while CANADN MILITIA. is impressed, worn on original ribbon with FORT DETROIT clasp, dark patina small edge bruises, in very fine condition.

 

Footnote: The War of 1812 occurred over a two-year period between the United States and Great Britain. The origins of this war were largely due to shipping restrictions sparked by the Napoleonic Wars in Europe. The battles took place in Upper Canada, Lower Canada, on the Great Lakes and the Atlantic, and in the United States.

In 1807, tensions exploded with a Maritime confrontation between the USS Chesapeake and the HMS Leopard. This may have been resolved with diplomacy, but instead war broke out. The Americans were motivated by Anglophobia, nationalism and the sentiment that Canada would be an easy territorial gain. War was a form of retaliation against Britain for the economic distress and what was interpreted as British support of the First Nations in resisting American expansion into the West. On June 18 1812, President Madison declared war against Great Britain.

Unbeknownst to the Americans, Upper Canada was better prepared than the Americans expected, largely because of the preparation of Major General Sir Isaac Brock, administrator of Upper Canada. These preparations included reinforcing fortifications, training militia units, and developing alliances with the First Nations.

On July 17, the British went on the offensive, capturing a key American post at Michilimackinac Island without any bloodshed. Meanwhile, an American force led by General William Hull had crossed from Detroit into Canada. When Brock marched men from York to face the invasion, they discovered the Americans had already withdrawn back to Detroit. Brock, backed by the great Shawnee chief Tecumseh, demanded that Hull surrender Detroit. The summons was rejected, and the British battery opened fire on the American fort. Roughly 530 First Nations warriors went across the river at night, and the British followed with 300 regulars, 30 Royal Artillery, 400 militia and 70 Grand River Iroquois in the daytime. On August 16, the forces marched up the road. A white flag appeared at 10am, but the American loss was still considerable: roughly 2188 men, 39 guns, a great deal of shot, flint, powder and supplies along with an unfinished ship later named Detroit. For the loss, General Hull was court martialled and condemned to death, although the sentence was commuted.

The war raged on, with other notable battles taking place at Queenston Heights, Crysler’s Farm, and Lundy Lane. Ultimately, the war was concluded with the Treaty of Ghent which was signed on Christmas Eve on 1814.

The 1812 Medal Roll identifies Private John Smilzer in the York Militia receiving the General Service Medal during the War of 1812. LAC records can be found in Volume 1202, Page 8, Microfilm Reel C-3519, Reference RG8, Item Number: 30136.

Back To Top