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  • Germany, Imperial. A iTD2 Army Infantry FIeld Telephone by Siemens & Halske, with Case, c.1913
  • Germany, Imperial. A iTD2 Army Infantry FIeld Telephone by Siemens & Halske, with Case, c.1913
  • Germany, Imperial. A iTD2 Army Infantry FIeld Telephone by Siemens & Halske, with Case, c.1913
  • Germany, Imperial. A iTD2 Army Infantry FIeld Telephone by Siemens & Halske, with Case, c.1913
  • Germany, Imperial. A iTD2 Army Infantry FIeld Telephone by Siemens & Halske, with Case, c.1913

Item: M0396-18

Germany, Imperial. A iTD2 Army Infantry FIeld Telephone by Siemens & Halske, with Case, c.1913

Price:

$130

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Germany, Imperial. A iTD2 Army Infantry FIeld Telephone by Siemens & Halske, with Case, c.1913

(Eiserner Armeefernsprecher) An olive painted magnetic metal field telephone. The speaker is shaped in a circle at located at the top of the phone. The handle of the phone bears a black button at the side for incoming signal strength increase and a white button at the front for calling. The front portion of the handle covered in black leather. The speaking portion of the phone at the bottom is hinged and flips down before speaking. Missing the self contained power cord and plug. With a handle at the top of the phone. Measuring 275 mm (h). Material fatigue evident due to use and age, missing rubber earpiece cover, but otherwise very fine. 

 

A brown structured leather case. With three straps with metal buckles. Apparent wear but otherwise very fine. 

 

Footnote: Telephones had been invented almost 40 years prior to the outbreak of the First World War, but had not been implemented in warfare until the First World War. Telephones were much easier to use than radios as radios were large, heavy, expensive and in short supply. This telephone model in particular was advanced in comparison to other belligerent telephone technology due to its self-contained power source. The wires laying on the ground where they could be cut or destroyed were a weakness when using telephones on the battlefield. On the Western Front, the telephone allowed armies spread over great distances to coordinate unit activity. Carrier pigeons and motorcycle couriers were also used, but the telephone was the fastest technology available. 

 

Provenance Footnote: Deaccessioned from the Museum Collection of the Royal Canadian Military Institute.

 

 

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