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eMedals-An American Service & Carnegie Medal Group to Olympic Swimmer

Item: W2862

An American Service & Carnegie Medal Group to Olympic Swimmer

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$1,500

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An American Service & Carnegie Medal Group to Olympic Swimmer

An American Service & Carnegie Medal Group to Olympic Swimmer - World War I Victory Medal 1917-1918, 4 Clasps - DEFENSIVE SECTOR, MEUSE-ARGONNE, YPRES-LYS, AISNE (bronze, 36 mm); Army of Occupation of Germany Medal 1918-1923 (bronze, 32.2 mm); American Campaign Medal 1941-1945 (bronze, 31.7 mm); European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal 1941-1945 (bronze, 32 mm, one bronze and three silver stars on the ribbon); Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal 1941-1945 (bronze, 32 mm); World War II Victory Medal 1941-1945 (bronze, 36 mm); Navy Army of Occupation Medal, 1 Clasp - ASIA (bronze, 32 mm); Korean Service Medal (bronze, 32 mm); National Defense Service Medal (bronze, 32 mm); and Naval Reserve Medal (bronze, 32.5 mm). Each is mounted to its own ribbon with brooch pinback, most with original ribbons, gilt wear evident on the World War I Victory Medal, near extremely fine. Accompanied by his Carnegie Medal for Heroism (bronze, marked "BRONZE", maker marked "J.E. CALDWELL & CO. PHILA." and marked "PAT. DEC. 11, '06" on the rim, inscribed on the reverse in raised lettering "J. ZOPHAR HOWELL WHO HELPED TO SAVE M. LILLIAN CREAMER FROM DROWNING / ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. / JUNE 20, 1915", 76 mm); a France: Water Sports (Sports Nautiques) 1st Place Medal (silvered bronze, marked "BRONZE" on the rim, engraved "1st PLACE / LT. J.Z. HOWELL / 50 METRES BREST (sic) STROKE / LE MANS / 31 MAY 1919" on the reverse, 42.4 mm); and a France: Water Sports (Sports Nautiques) 2nd Place Medal (bronze, marked "BRONZE" on the rim, engraved "2nd PLACE / LT. J.Z. HOWELL / 50 METRES FREE STYLE / LE MANS / 31 MAY 1919" on the reverse, 42.4 mm). Three bronze medals also near extremely fine.   Footnote: Jackson Zophar Howell was born on January 29, 1899 in San Francisco, California and was an accomplished swimmer, affiliated with the Oakland Athletic Club. He was awarded the Carnegie Medal for Heroism for saving M. Lillian Creamer from drowning at Atlantic City, New Jersey, on June 20, 1915. She was caught by a giant wave and struggled for life in the undertow, along with two hundred others, many of those rescued by the formation of a human chain. It was described in The New York Times as "the highest tide of the Summer and one of the strongest undertows ever known here swept along the beach". Three people perished that day in Atlantic City, along with five others further along the coast. He soon saw service overseas in France with the American Expeditionary Force during the First World War. After the war, Howell participated in a pre-Olympic swimming competition in Le Mans, France, on May 31, 1919, finishing First in the 50-meter Breaststroke and Second in the 50-meter Free Style. As a competition swimmer, and now age 21, he represented the United States at the VII Summer Olympics in Antwerp, Belgium in 1920. He competed in both the men's 200-meter Breaststroke and the men's 400-meter Breaststroke, finishing in fourth place in both event finals. He later served as a Lieutenant with the United States Navy during the Second World War and the Korean War. Howell died on February 25, 1967, in Los Angeles, California, at the age of 68.  
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