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eMedals-A WWI British Group to the Commander of Coastal Destroyer T.B. 4

Item: GB4327

A WWI British Group to the Commander of Coastal Destroyer T.B. 4

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A WWI British Group to the Commander of Coastal Destroyer T.B. 4

A WWI British Group to the Commander of Coastal Destroyer T.B. 4 - 1914-15 Star (LIEUT. F.R. BRITCHFIELD, R.N.); British War Medal (LIEUT F.R. BRITCHFIELD. R.N.); and Victory Medal (LIEUT F.R. BRITCHFIELD. R.N.). Naming is officially impressed. Court-mounted, light contact, extremely fine. Accompanied by a duotang folder with his military biography, copies of three death notices and five black and white ship photographs.   Footnote: Frederick Russell Britchfield was born on September 5, 1865. He achieved the rank of Gunner on July 4, 1893, then saw a series of postings: to the Sailing Brig H.M.S. Dolphin (effective September 18, 1893), to the Gunnery Ship H.M.S. Cambridge at Devonport (effective April 29, 1897), to the Second Class Protected Cruiser H.M.S. Hermione (effective July 30, 1901), returning to the Gunnery Ship H.M.S. Cambridge at Devonport and attached to H.M.S. Vivid for Gunnery School (effective March 18, 1905), to the Battleship H.M.S. Duncan, as part of the 4th Battleship Squadron (effective July 26, 1910, where he was named Chief Gunner on April 26, 1911) and returned to the Gunnery School at H.M.S. Vivid (effective August 12, 1912). It is worthy to note, that in December 1902, at a Court of Inquiry, the First Lords expressed displeasure at the evidence he gave. During the First World War, he was in command of a small coastal destroyer, the T.B. 4 on North Sea patrols, as of August 1914. On November 29, 1915, he was posted to one of his former ships, to the Gunnery School at H.M.S. Vivid at Devonport, training new gunners, followed by his naming one month later, to the rank of Lieutenant, on December 9th. Britchfield was admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital Stonehouse for a carbunkle on his neck, on August 15, 1918. This was later connected to his death of cancer of the neck. He retired from active service in 1921. He was a resident of Plymouth and was married to Mary Jane Britchfield (died August 4, 1937, at the age of 69), when he passed away on February 4, 1923 at the age of 58, and is buried in Plymouth Old Cemetery in Church L/H 19/12. At the time of his death, he had two children, one of whom was a son, Frederick William Britchfield, who died almost four months after his father, on May 30, 1923, at the age of 29. There was no medical evidence to prove that his death from cancer was attributed to his war service and therefore, his widow was only awarded the Admiralty pension of Fifty Pounds. However a special application was put forward for a Compassionate Allowance for two children, one of whom was nearly blind.  
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