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eMedals-A MEMORIAL CROSS TO THE NO. 8 STATIONARY HOSPITAL AT CAMIERS

Item: C3693

A MEMORIAL CROSS TO THE NO. 8 STATIONARY HOSPITAL AT CAMIERS

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A MEMORIAL CROSS TO THE NO. 8 STATIONARY HOSPITAL AT CAMIERS

A First War Memorial Cross to the No. 8 Stationary Hospital at Camiers - (534241 Pte. W.J. MITCHELL). Naming is officially engraved. Light contact, tarnish mark on the reverse, near extremely fine. Accompanied by copies of his Index Cards, Attestation Paper, Service Records, Medical Records and Discharge Certificates.   Footnote: William James Mitchell was born on October 10, 1888 in Ottawa, Ontario. He signed his Attestation Paper on April 6, 1916 in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, with the Canadian Army Medical Corps, naming his next-of-kin as his mother, Mrs. John Mitchell of Ottawa, stating that he had one years' previous military service with the Duke of Connaught's Own Rifles, that he was not married and that his trade was that of Clerk, also referred to on one of his discharge papers as Grocer. Mitchell was posted to No. 8 Stationary Hospital, embarking Halifax, Nova Scotia on May 22, 1916 aboard the S.S. Adriatic, arriving in Liverpool, England on the 30th. He was placed on command for duty to Moore Barracks Hospital at Shorncliffe on June 7th for the next seven and a half months, before returning to No. 8 Stationary Hospital on January 22, 1917. The following summer, he was granted permission to marry (Edith) at Dunkirk on July 6, 1917. Mitchell was posted for one month to the Canadian Special Hospital at Witley on October 9, 1917, returning to No. 8 Stationary Hospital on November 10th. He entered the French theatre on December 5, 1917 with No. 8 Stationary Hospital, where he treated the wounded and sick at the battles of Cambrai, Arras, Amiens and other horrific conflicts, remaining in France for sixteen months. Four months after arriving in France, he was granted a Good Conduct Badge on April 6, 1918. Mitchell was admitted on July 1, 1918, to No. 8 Stationary Hospital at Camiers with a case of Influenza and discharged to service on the 5th. Two weeks later, he was re-admitted with a "Debility" (Pneumonia) on July 18th, operated upon, and after four weeks hospitalization, was discharged on August 14th. Upon the ceasing of hostilities, Mitchell returned to England on April 9, 1919 and was posted to the Canadian Army Medical Corps Casualty Company at Cooden Beach, Bexhill on April 25, 1919 for the next three months. He embarked Liverpool, England aboard the S.S. Canada on July 28, 1919, arriving in Quebec City, Quebec on August 7th. Mitchell was discharged upon demobilization on August 8, 1919 at Military District No. 5, Quebec Depot in Quebec City by Clearing Service Command. Twenty years later, on June 21, 1939, Mitchell died from complications he received incurred during his war service, traced to his contracting influenza and a follow-up serious operation performed while he was overseas in 1918, deeming him eligible for the Memorial Cross. His widow, Mrs. Edith Mitchell of Ottawa, whom he had married while overseas in 1917, received his only Memorial Cross, as his mother, Mrs. John Mitchell of Ottawa, had already passed away. 8th Overseas Stationary Hospital was one of only two Stationary Hospitals that wore a distinctive cap badge.  
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