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eMedals-A Memorial Cross to the 2nd Cdn Infantry Battalion

Item: C1475

A Memorial Cross to the 2nd Cdn Infantry Battalion

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$200

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A Memorial Cross to the 2nd Cdn Infantry Battalion

A Memorial Cross to the 2nd Cdn Infantry Battalion - Victory Medal (675598 PTE. H. COLE. 2-CAN.INF.); and Memorial Cross (675598. Pte H. COLE.). Naming is officially impressed on the VM and officially engraved on the MC. Un-mounted, original ribbons, light contact and gilt wear, better than very fine. Accompanied by a CDcontaining twelve pages with copies of his Index Cards, Attestation Paper, Service Records, Medical Records and Military Will. Footnote: Henry Cole was born on November 14, 1895 in Vienna, Ontario. He signed his Attestation Paper with the 168th Infantry Battalion, on February 13, 1916 at Ingersoll, Ontario, at the age of 20, naming his next-of-kin as his mother, Addie Cole of Beachville, Ontario, stating that he had no previous military service, that he was not married and that his trade was that of Labourer. The Battalion was raised in Oxford County, Ontario with mobilization headquarters at Woodstock under the authority of G.O. 151, December 2, 1915. During his training, Cole was admitted to hospital four months later, at London, Ontario, from June 1 to 17, 1916, with "Impetigo Contagiosa" (a highly contagious bacterial skin infection, this being the common version of impetigo, most often beginning as a red sore near the nose or mouth which soon breaks, leaking pus or fluid, and forms a honey-colored scab, followed by a red mark which heals without leaving a scar), making a full recovery. Late that Fall, the Battalion sailed from Halifax, Nova Scotia on November 1, 1916 aboard the S.S. Lapland, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.K. McMullen with a strength of 26 officers and 688 other ranks, arriving in Liverpool, England on the 11th. The following month, he was transferred to the 39th Infantry Battalion on December 5th at West Sandling, taken on strength the same day. He soon saw another transfer, this time to the 6th Reserve Battalion at West Sandling on January 4, 1917, taken on strength the same day. Six weeks later, he was drafted by the 2nd Battalion on February 14, 1917 at East Sandling, arriving at the Canadian Base Depot in France the following day. Cole left for the 2nd Battalion on the 17th, joining them in the field on the 19th. He was admitted to hospital "sick" at No. 1 Canadian Field Ambulance on March 1, 1917, with "Defective Vision" but was soon cleared to rejoin the 2nd Battalion the next day. Cole was with the 2nd Battalion (Eastern Ontario Regiment) and was "reported wounded and missing after action and was struck off strength accordingly" on May 3, 1917. His status was later updated to "for official purposes presumed to have died on or since". He is remembered with honour on the Vimy Memorial, Pas de Calais, France, the base of which is inscribed in French and in English: "TO THE VALOUR OF THEIR COUNTRYMEN IN THE GREAT WAR AND IN MEMORY OF THEIR SIXTY THOUSAND DEAD THIS MONUMENT IS RAISED BY THE PEOPLE OF CANADA". Inscribed on the ramparts of the Vimy Memorial are the names of over 11,000 Canadian soldiers who were posted as "'missing, presumed dead" in France. His Military Will, which he signed while with the 6th Reserve Battalion, dated February 7, 1917, stated that "At the event on my death I leave all my property and effects to my mother, Mr. Neil Barker (the former Addie Cole), Beachville, Ont, Can." His mother received his Scroll, Plaque and Memorial Cross, in addition to his trio of medals, of which only the Victory Medal, along with his Memorial Cross are presented here for sale.
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