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eMedals-A First War Memorial Cross to the 73rd Battalion for Action outside Arras

Item: C3626

A First War Memorial Cross to the 73rd Battalion for Action outside Arras

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A First War Memorial Cross to the 73rd Battalion for Action outside Arras

A First War Memorial Cross to the 73rd Battalion for Action outside Arras - Henry "Harry" David McIntosh was born on September 23, 1897 in Almonte, Ontario, the son of Robert McIntosh and Annie McIntosh. He signed his Attestation Paper as a Private (132315) with the 73rd Infantry Battalion "Royal Highlanders of Canada", on September 7, 1915 in Montreal, Quebec, at the age of 17, sixteen days shy of his eighteenth birthday (although his age is stated as 18 years, 11 months on his Attestation Paper), naming his next-of-kin as his mother, Annie McIntosh, stating that he had previous service with the 43rd (perhaps 42nd) Lanark and Renfrew Regiment, that he was not married and that his trade was that of Stenographer. His religion was Presbyterian. McIntosh was admitted to Montreal General Hospital on November 20, 1915 with a case of "Pharyngitis" (an inflammation of the back of the throat, that can cause a sore throat, as well as scratchiness in the throat and difficulty swallowing) and after three days treatment, was discharged on the 23rd. The 73rd Infantry Battalion was raised in Western Quebec and Eastern Ontario with mobilization headquarters at Montreal, Quebec under the authority of G.O. 103A, August 15, 1915. The Battalion sailed from Halifax, Nova Scotia, on March 31, 1916 aboard the RMS Adriatic, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel P. Davidson with a strength of 36 officers and 1,033 other ranks, arriving in Liverpool, England on April 9th. The Battalion served in France and Belgium with the 12th Infantry Brigade, 4th Canadian Division. McIntosh was admitted to hospital a second time, this time to Cherry Hinton Military Hospital in Cambridge, on May 12, 1916, with a case of "Gonorrhea". After three weeks treatment, he was discharged from hospital on June 8th. He left for overseas service on August 12, 1916, arriving in Le Havre, France on the 13th. Private Harry McIntosh, 73rd Infantry Battalion, was Killed in Action on March 1, 1917, at the age of 19. He is buried in Villers Station Cemetery, Villiers-au-Bois, Pas de Calais, France, Grave Reference: VII. E. 4., eleven kilometres northwest of Arras and is commemorated on page 283 of the First World War Book of Remembrance. His Will, dated June 10, 1916, stated that he left his real and personal estate to his mother, Annie McIntosh of Almonte. She also received his British War Medal, Victory Medal, Memorial Cross, Plaque and Scroll. An inscription to the memory of Private McIntosh appears on the family grave marker at Auld Kirk Cemetery, Almonte, Ontario.      
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