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eMedals-A First War Memorial Cross to the 43rd Canadian Infantry; KIA

Item: C3524

A First War Memorial Cross to the 43rd Canadian Infantry; KIA

On July 29, 2017 Auction Won For

$141

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A First War Memorial Cross to the 43rd Canadian Infantry; KIA

A First War Memorial Cross to the 43rd Canadian Infantry; KIA - Victory Medal (420693 PTE. J. WEIR. 43-CAN.INF.); and Memorial Cross, GRV (420693. Pte. J. WEIR.). Naming is officially impressed on the VM and officially engraved on the MC. Dark patina on the MC, extremely fine. Footnote: James Weir was born on July 25, 1882 in Belfast, Ireland. He was a resident of Winnipeg, Manitoba when he signed his Attestation Paper as a Private (420693) with the 43rd Infantry Battalion "Cameron Highlanders", on January 5, 1915 in Winnipeg, at the age of 32, naming his next-of-kin as his wife, Sarah Weir, stating that he had previous service with the Royal Irish Rifles, that he was Married and that his trade was that of Teamster. The Battalion was raised in Winnipeg, Manitoba, which was also the mobilization headquarters, under the authority of G.O. 86, July 1, 1915. The Battalion left Canada on June 1, 1915 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel R.M. Thomson with a strength of 40 officers and 998 other ranks. The Battalion served in France and Belgium with the 9th Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division. Private Weir was with the 43rd Infantry Battalion when he was Killed in Action on September 2, 1916, during the Battle of the Somme and is remembered with honour on the Vimy Memorial, Pas de Calais, France. At the base of the memorial, these words appear in French and in English: "TO THE VALOUR OF THEIR COUNTRYMEN IN THE GREAT WAR AND IN MEMORY OF THEIR SIXTY THOUSAND DEAD THIS MONUMENT IS RAISED BY THE PEOPLE OF CANADA." Inscribed on the ramparts of the Vimy Memorial are the names of over 11,000 Canadian soldiers who were posted as "'missing, presumed dead" in France. He is commemorated on page 180 of the First World War Book of Remembrance
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