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eMedals-Prevost Family Passchendaele KIA Memorial Group

Item: C0393

Prevost Family Passchendaele KIA Memorial Group

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Prevost Family Passchendaele KIA Memorial Group

British War and Victory Medals (490263 A. SJT. W.M. PREVOST. CAN. PNR. BN.) and Canadian Memorial Cross (490263 Pte. W.M. PREVOST). Naming on the two war medals is officially impressed, while the cross if officially engraved. Unmounted, slight contact marks on cross, near extremely fine. Also included are his bronze Memorial Plaque (WILFRED MORESBY PREVOST). Accompanied by copies of his Attestation Paper, Service Records, Casulty Form, Medical Records and original copies of his Baptismal Certificate, Marriage Certificate, two newspaper articles, two Probate documents, a Canadian Pacific telegram with delivery envelope and various correspondences from Ottawa regarding his death and estate, plus three photographs. Footnote: Wilfred Moresby Prevost was born on September 23, 1883 in Victoria, British Columbia. He was the son of James Charles and Anna Jane Prevost and the grandson of Admiral Provost, Royal Navy, the one time commander of the British naval forces on the Esquimalt Station and after whom Mount Prevost, near Duncan, is named. His father was at one time registrar of the Supreme Court of British Columbia. He was husband to Harriet Maud Prevost of Duncan, British Columbia, whom he married on January 13, 1913. Wilfred Prevost made surveying his profession, having been employed by the Tyree Copper Company. The last two years he resided in Duncan, he was working at the Cowichan Merchants' store. He enlisted with the 1st Canadian Pioneers, signing his Attestation Paper on March 20, 1916 at Victoria, at the age of 32, stating that he was married and his trade was that of Surveyor's Assistant. He left Halifax on April 28, 1916 bound for Liverpool and disembarked there on May 7, 1916, later seeing service with the 25th Canadian Reserve Battalion and the 2nd Pioneer Battalion. While overseas, he attained the rank of Sergeant and for fifteen months, despite a dozen applications for permission to revert, he was kept on the staff as musketry instructor. His prowess as a hunter and accurate shot in Cowichan solidified his status in the Army. His repeated requests to be allowed to go to France were finally granted, two months before he was killed. He reverted to the rank of Private and once there, refused an offer that his rank should be restored, provided he would go back to the base and instruct. In France and Belgium, the conflict against Germany had ecscalated. British, Australian and New Zealand forces fought for months with few advances and 100,000 casulties. When the Canadian Corps was ordered to relieve Anzac forces in October, Canadian Lieutenant-General Arthur Currie objected but was overruled. Canadians began their series of attacks on October 26, 1917 at the Second Battle of Passchendaele. That very day, Private Prevost, Canadian Pioneers, 2nd Battalion, was Killed in Action in the field. In a letter received by his wife the same day as the sad news of his death arrived, he wrote that he never felt so happy and contented in his life. He felt that he was "really doing something at last". His wife was informed of his passing via Canadian Pacific telegram, by the Militia and Defence Department in Ottawa on November 11, 1917: "Deeply regret inform you Four nine naught two six three Pte. Wilfred Moresby Prevost Infantry, officially reported Killed in action October twenty sixth nineteen seventeen. Director of Records". He died at the age of 34, leaving behind his wife, Maud, and his son, age 3. He lays at rest in the Potijze Chateau Lawn Cemetery, near Ieper, Belgium, Grave G. 20.
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