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Important Canadian group of awards to Pelletier Family, including awards to Colonel Oscar Charles Pelletier, wounded During North West Rebellion, who was also Second in Command of the First Canadian South African Contingent, and was also wounded in South Africa. Pair to C.O.PELLETIER: North West Canada Medal, clasp "SASKATCHEWAN", officially impressed: LIEUT.C.PELLETIER R.C.A.; France, Legion of Honor, breast Badge in silver gilt and enamels with Gold center. WWI Trio to his son, Lieutenant Rene Archer Pelletier: 1914-15 Star (23082 C.Q.M. SJT. R.A. PELLETIER 15/CAN.INF.); British War and Victory Medals, both impressed: LIEUT. R.A. PELLETIER. Cousin, Private Luc Pelletier: WWI Pair, British War and Victory Medals, impressed: 417005 PTE. L. PELLETIER 22-CAN.INF; Memorial Cross (cased), and memorial Plaque, both officially named to PTE. L. PELLETIER; and (framed) original scroll named to Pte. Pelletier. All awards in very fine to extremely fine condition. Oscar Charles Pelletier was the son of L'Hon Charles Alphonse Pantaleon Pelletier K.C.M.G. Father was at the time (1873-79) a Liberal senator who had been minister of agriculture in the Alexander Mackenzie government and was opposed to his son's taking up a military career. All the same, Oscar enlisted in the Queen's Own Canadian Hussars in Quebec City, before transferring to the 9th Battalion of Carabineers, later the Quebec Regiment of Voltigeurs. In June 1884, after some three years' service, Pelletier registered at the St Jean d?Iberville infantry school to obtain certificates confirming his rank as an officer. He was surrounded by generally bilingual officers of Canadian and British stock; D'Odet d'Orsonnens was commander of the school. At the outbreak of hostilities in the North-West, Pelletier was a lieutenant on an artillery course at RMC Kingston, where B Battery, a permanent unit, was stationed at the time. Eager to enter the field of battle, he was determined to get a transfer to that unit. He approached his uncle, P-B. Casgrain, the Liberal MP for L'Islet whose family connections included the Conservative minister of militia and defence, Adolphe Caron. The B Battery commander had no choice but to accept Pelletier, whom he attached to one of the two field artillery troops. When the force formed up in three columns, Pelletier and his artillerymen were placed with Otter. In the battle of Cut Knife Hill, a bullet passed right through Pelletier's left thigh, without, however, breaking the bone. After the North West Campaign Pelletier returned to Quebec City but shortly thereafter went to England to attend military academy. Upon return he was promoted to Major. When the Boer War started Major Pelletier was put as Second in command of The Royal Canadian Regiment of Infantry (First Contingent). He was wounded at Paardeberg, February 27TH. 1900. (Whereabouts of his QSA Medal with three clasps unknown). In 1908, during the 300Th. Year anniversary of the creation of the Quebec City Oscar Pelletier was ADC of a French Admiral who came here for the celebration and received Legion of Honor. In 1912, after 27 years' service and growing increasingly hard of hearing, Colonel Oscar Pelletier decided to retire. He was living quietly in Kamouraska, Quebec, when, in August 1914, he was entrusted with a special mission: to go to Anticosti Island and secure control of a Marconi radio unit that might be a target for the Germans. Even before the war officially began, Pelletier was on his way to the island, located in the mouth of the St Lawrence River, with a small party of men. He remained on Anticosti until October when he was relieved by a permanent Force. Pelletier then resumed his retirement, but the war was not over for the Pelletier family. His elder daughter became a volunteer nurse, and one of his sons, Rene Archer Pelletier (also a volunteer) would die in September 27, 1916 as a result of wounds sustained in combat. Rene Pelletier?s name appears in the regimental history and he was described as a courageous officer (from Regimental history of 14Th. Can.Inf.): "This satisfactory report was confirmed by Lieutenant R.A. Pelletier, of No4 Coy, who returned to Battalion Headquarters Wounded. After his wounds dressed, Lieu. Pelletier insisted on rejoining his Company in the line. It would be agreeable to report that this brave officer survived but such was not the case. He fell before the day was ended. Pelletier had previously distinguished himself during the advance of the Royal Montreal Regiment on the morning of June 3rd 1916 and in the engagement now under review his courage and behavior had commanded the respect of all. His death, therefore, was a matter of deep regret to the 14th Battalion."His cousin No.417 005 Pte. Luc Pelletier 22 Canadian Infantry Battalion served during The Great War and died after the War in 1923. He was awarded BWM and Victory Medals (both impressed), also Memorial cross, plaque, and Scroll (contained in an old frame). This Family Group comes with very extensive research papers and copies of Service Records (over 200 pages); copy of the book (in French) written by Colonel Pelletier describing his Military Service, including North West Campaign, Boer War.
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